How to smoke on a gas grill

Jason Webster
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Basics of Smoking on a Gas Grill

Learning how to smoke on a gas grill provides an inexpensive alternative to high-priced smokers and allows you to smoke food outside year-round.

If you have ever wanted to replace that extra storage on your deck or patio with a smoker, this is a great project to get you cooking in no time.

With a little planning and a few basic tools and materials, a gas grill smoker can be assembled quickly and cheaply.

Smoking on a gas grill is different from smacking in that the smoker box uses indirect heat. This allows you to cook food while smoking for longer periods of time than directly grilling it.

It is best to find the box or foil pan with a lid before you start buying other materials. The pan can be a disposable foil container or a tin box that can be used over and over again.

The important thing is that the smoking pan has a place for the wood chips to hang over a charcoal or natural gas fire.

Once you have located your smoking pan, it’s time to decide how to attach it to the grill.

In the past, people used hangers made out of coat hangers but this can be dangerous especially for a gas grill. Fire hazards aside, the material can melt and drip onto the food or the fire.

Other people used bent coat hangers to attach the container to the handle on top of the lid or the sides of the grill.

There is nothing better than the smell of barbecue. And that’s because the barbecue food has been prepared using the quintessential American smoker: the gas grill.

If you are a backyard cook who loves to smoke or barbeque food, you will definitely need a gas grill in order to do some smoking. And if you already have a gas grill, you will need to learn how to smoke on a gas grill so you can entertain friends and family in a most delicious way.

While your barbecue grills are the perfect cooking device, if you don’t know how to use the right tool to prepare the foods, you may not be able to get the best results.

For most people, grilling over a charcoal setting is the process of putting the meat over the fire so it can grill or bake and create delicious smoke once the fat begins to drip. But, if you are using a gas grill, you will have to cook over a different setting.

In order to smoke on a gas grill, you will need to use the indirect heat method in order to create smoke.

However, because gas grills have different parts, which can produce different sources of heat, it pays to know which setting will work for the process.

Two-Zone Indirect Setup

If you’re a relatively newbie to smoking and grilling with a gas grill, the best setup for you is the two-zone indirect method. This setup is easy to control, and is a safety-friendly setup for smoking.

To set this up, you will first need to light wood chips in the middle of the grill and place the meat on the grill grate at a safe distance from the flames. Let this smoke burn for a few minutes. This is your primary burn.

After a few minutes, you can open the primary burn and adjust the dampers to take it up to temperature. Set the meat on the grate and close the grill. Give it 20 minutes to an hour and you’ll have a nice, juicy, smoky, and delicious meat.

Correct Burner Configuration

When it comes to smoking on a gas grill, it is important to know that the burners wouldn’t be utilized the same way a gas smoker would.

For one, you need to set your grill up in an indirect set up. The indirect set up has burners going just above the charcoal. As for the heat output, you need to set it at a low level.

So as to get a fire that is hot enough to smoke food, you need to keep the burners set at a high burn setting, and instead, use additional briquettes. Anything that can raise the temperature above 250F (120 C) would suffice.

In this method, however, it is important to keep in mind that briquettes burn hotter when they’re soaked in water. So when ready for smoking, set it up in a manner where the briquettes are just partially soaked in water for medium heat.

There is nothing better than the smell of barbecue. And that’s because the barbecue food has been prepared using the quintessential American smoker: the gas grill.

If you are a backyard cook who loves to smoke or barbeque food, you will definitely need a gas grill in order to do some smoking. And if you already have a gas grill, you will need to learn how to smoke on a gas grill so you can entertain friends and family in a most delicious way.

While your barbecue grills are the perfect cooking device, if you don’t know how to use the right tool to prepare the foods, you may not be able to get the best results.

For most people, grilling over a charcoal setting is the process of putting the meat over the fire so it can grill or bake and create delicious smoke once the fat begins to drip. But, if you are using a gas grill, you will have to cook over a different setting.

In order to smoke on a gas grill, you will need to use the indirect heat method in order to create smoke.

However, because gas grills have different parts, which can produce different sources of heat, it pays to know which setting will work for the process.

Monitoring Grill Temperature

There is one key to smoking on a gas grill: controlling the heat. This will ensure that your meat doesn’t burn and you smoke cooks it to the desired temperature.

To control the heat, you need to monitor the temperature inside your grill. When you’re smoking on a gas grill, open the cover and leave it open to improve airflow.

You can use thermometers to monitor the temperature but look for the kind with a 100-300 degree range because the range in which you are smoking is likely less than that.

Replace any plastic parts in the grill that touch the food with stainless steel parts. As well, ensure the thermometers are safe to use on your grill as they are likely to get very hot.

How to Make Smoke

Regardless of what kind of grill you're using, the crux of making great smoked or grilled food is smoke. Unlike charcoal or wood, gas doesn't allow you to create smoke, which means that you're usually limited to searing or cooking at low temperatures.

Luckily, there are a few tricks to producing smoke on a gas grill. Most involve opening up the grill, removing some accessories and stocking your grill with either soaked wood chips or an aluminum foil packet that gets a little match action. It's all very DIY and the result is smoke that doesn't overpower the meat.

First things first, you'll want to drain the gas tank. Raise the grill and make sure all the ports are clear. If you're using wood chips, soak them in water for an hour. Then, grab a handful of chips and stuff them into a small container like a coffee can or a short length of PVC pipe.

Open the grill, being careful of the grill grate and place the container close to the fire box, but off the heat sources. You can also place it into the space above the burners.

The heat will cause the container to release smoke, which is captured by the water-soaked wood chips, bubbling in the heat of the coals.

Close the grill and wait 5-10 minutes. Make sure to place the lid on top of the grill so no one mistakes it for a campfire.

Create smoke with a pellet tube

Handheld smoke generators are small, easy to use, portable tools that can be attached to a grill to add smoke to your food with press of a button. Common types are made of stainless steel with a fiberglass filament that burns pellets or sawdust.

They are also referred to as smoke tubes.

By simply inserting a pellet tube into your grill, you’ll have a reliable source of smoke to flavor your food.

The pellet tube smokes for about 20 to 30 minutes. You open up the lid of your grill and place the tube on the grill grates. That’s pretty much it.

The device generates smoke when the pellets are heated to the point of burn.

Pellet tubes are easily transportable. Simply load the pellets and take them with you on a picnic.

Different models may be powered by gas or electricity. Gas models are powered by a propane tank and electricity by a 12 volt DC converter.

As a rule of thumb, a good place to start is with the original pellets that came with the unit. There are also specially formulated pellets to create stronger smoke for longer smoking times.

If you’re looking to do real barbecue and smoke a full rack of ribs or a whole brisket, I’d recommend using a real smoker box like this one from Dotson..

DIY options to create smoke on a gas grill

Smoke is a great way to add complimentary flavor and complexity to food whether you are smoking a turkey in your home oven or smoking ribs and briskets in a smoker outside.

Smoking on a regular old gas grill is possible, it just takes a little DIY effort.

While a lot of people would rather have a dedicated smoker for their home, chances are if you have a portable gas grill, it’s already part of your outdoor hub.

But grilling on your gas grill doesn’t close the smoking door entirely. There are different ways and techniques to pull off a great smoky gas grilled meal.

Some of the most common options are using foil packets, smoking wood chips and even adding wood chunks to the grill. The only downside to going the wood route is that you may have to piddle with it while cooking and you won’t be able to use that side burner.

Step by Step Instructions

{1}. Move coals out to edge.
{2}. When coals are white, place meat directly over them. Do not put meat on grill rack – it will stick. Brush with a little olive oil. Set grill cover on.
{3}. When you see fat start to drip, remove cover and start topping with wood chips and or newspapers.
{4}. MAINTAIN COVER FOR 45 MINUTES WITH SMOKE.
{5}. Finish by drizzling with olive oil.

Step 1: Light your burner to medium heat

On one side.

There is nothing better than the smell of barbecue. And that’s because the barbecue food has been prepared using the quintessential American smoker: the gas grill.

If you are a backyard cook who loves to smoke or barbeque food, you will definitely need a gas grill in order to do some smoking. And if you already have a gas grill, you will need to learn how to smoke on a gas grill so you can entertain friends and family in a most delicious way.

While your barbecue grills are the perfect cooking device, if you don’t know how to use the right tool to prepare the foods, you may not be able to get the best results.

For most people, grilling over a charcoal setting is the process of putting the meat over the fire so it can grill or bake and create delicious smoke once the fat begins to drip. But, if you are using a gas grill, you will have to cook over a different setting.

In order to smoke on a gas grill, you will need to use the indirect heat method in order to create smoke.

However, because gas grills have different parts, which can produce different sources of heat, it pays to know which setting will work for the process.

Step 2: Add your wood

When you are adding wood to your grill, make sure you are adding chunks. Use either small wood, large wood, or a combination of small and large wood. Place the wood evenly spaced on opposite sides of the grill.

Timing is very important to smoking meats. Make sure you place your wood and fill up your chimney 15 minutes before you place your meat on the grill. This way it will get nice and hot by the time you put your meat on.

Step 3: Get smokin!

So here we are with your gas barbecue outfitted with a smoking insert and loaded with wood chips. We have the temperature in the smoker set at 225F with the lid closed. We are ready for the big smoke!

The standard formula for grilling meat is cooking it for twice as long at half the temperature. So for our BBQ we want to cook it at 225F for about 1.5 hours but before that we need to decide whether we are going to use indirect or direct heat.

Direct heat is pretty self-explanatory. In this situation the coals are placed directly under the lid and the food is placed directly on the grate.

Indirect heat is done by placing the coals to one side of the barbecue and not directly underneath the grate. You may also place a metal tray underneath the grate on which the food may be placed. The reason for this is because the coals on one side of the barbecue generate a lot of heat whereas the other side does not. This allows the heat to be directed to one side or the other of the barbecue. Maintaining the same temperature on both side can be done by placing the lid on one side of the barbecue. The lid acts as a shield, directing the heat to the left hand side.

Top 12 best BBQ blogs in 2016

I have put together a list of the top 12 bbq blogs in 2016, these bbq blogs are actually getting a lot of traffic compared to the other bbq blogs on the internet. I rank them based on their Alexa Rank and Content.

The BBQ blog network I built has also been getting a lot of traffic as well. So here is the updated list of the top 12 blogs and the websites they are hosted on with their Alexa Rank

Barbecue Bible (Alexa rank: 28090)

The Meatwave (Alexa rank: 97,613)

The BBQ Tag (Alexa rank: 595,376)

BBQ Beat (Alexa rank: 47,730)

BeerBQ (Alexa rank: 344,645)

Haiku of Q (Alexa rank: 185,161)

How2bbqright (Alexa rank: 181,443)

Maverick’s Barbecue (Alexa rank: 881,031)

BBQ with Franklin (Alexa rank: 7,267,241)

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